Archive for flowers

Sunny Afternoon with Nikon D600 and Nikon 105mm F2.8 VR

Posted in photography with tags , , , , , , on May 7, 2017 by yammerman

 

Catch the Sun with a Fuji X Pro-1 and 60mm Lens

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , on April 29, 2014 by yammerman

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As my marigold clad hands scrubbed the wok used to prepare a rather fiery stir fry (the radical chilli flourish perhaps a mistake) I happened to notice a fine yellow light was playing on the  flowering clematis.   I expected it to have vanished by the time I reached the final sponging of the surfaces, but for once the camera gods smiled upon me.  So I snatched up my Fuji X Pro-1 and 60mm lens and went to catch the sun as the band Doves once so wisely advised.

If I had paid more attention in physics at school or had not foolishly wasted my memory to recall the fine goal Plymouth Argyle scored against Peterborough Utd in 1974, I could perhaps tell you why the light is yellow in the evening.  Thankfully both you and I can look that up in our own time when we have exhausted the trivial addiction that is social media and have some spare time for a proper use of the internet.

I can tell you that it had likely taken 8 minutes for the sunlight that now caressed the clematis to get to Earth and I suspected I had somewhat less than that to capture it.  I didn’t really expect success, in much the same way that vast beautiful landscapes are rendered dull in holiday snaps, as light is a slippery fish at times.  It is generally more by luck than judgement that I obtain in the halides or pixels what I actually saw at the time.

The photo gods, like the golf gods, realise that in order to keep you coming back for more, they should allow you some success once in a while.  Not, perhaps, in the way you’d intended but just the beautiful crack of a ball on club, or a photo that shows the world not as a chaotic unjust shambles peopled by greedy bankers and corrupt politicians, but something sublime and beautiful that you will miss so very much when the lights go out.

These are by no means perfect,  after all the tripod was up too many damn stairs for my dodgy knees, but I do like them enough that continuing to press the shutter may yet provide me some degree of pleasure.

 

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Spring in the Garden with Leica R4s and 60mm Macro-Elmarit

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 25, 2010 by yammerman

So back to the photography and all those films I have piled up in the darkroom. I developed three films today shot on Rollei 400s. I had no idea what was on them so I was throwing some mystery in to the delayed gratification equation. It is as well that I’ve started using Rodinal as its attribute of sitting on the shelf for ages is coming in very handy.

I found some very long development times on the Massive Dev database but found one at a dilution of 1:25 for this film that would take 10.5 mins @ 20 degrees. In the end, the water was at 21 degrees so, knowing I was going to scan the film, I took it down to 8 minutes. The fix and stop seeming to be holding up, despite lack of use, and the results came out pretty much as expected.

There are many random factors at work here, mostly stemming from my cavalier attitude to what, to some, is a very exact science. But, starting with my exposure calculation then chemical dilution, water temperature and agitation regime etc, I’m never going to do the same thing twice and so have come to love the happy accident and shrug at the disasters.

These seem to have come out with a pleasant grain and this first sample, if I remember correctly, is from the Spring. I have a vague recollection of getting out my Leica R4s and 60mm Macro Elmarit and spending a pleasant hour in the garden. This kind of shooting seems to suit me and that lens is a cracker and rarely disappoints. The camera is one of the lower budget SLRs that Leica once produced and a bit of clunker but, if it lets me use this lens, then I’m happy enough with it.

 Here then are the best of the bunch, scanned with Epson V700 and toned with the Antique Grayscale preset in Lightroom