Archive for nikon f3

Double Exposure with a Nikon F3

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , on May 10, 2014 by yammerman

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Still in my on-going familiarisation process with the Nikon F3, so I thought it wise to have a look at the manual to ensure I was its master.  I was prompted by the fact that I couldn’t find the self-timer which I was convinced it must possess.  My assumption proved correct as the movement of a lever by the shutter dial does the trick.  I noticed that I could also achieve double exposures with the use of another small switch by the shutter button.   This aroused my curiosity with the possibilities.

This week I set about my annual ritual of oiling the garden furniture which means placing the chairs in two rows in the garden.  Rows of empty seats are familiar to me from my days in no-hoper bands, playing to an indifferent public; so  it occurred to me I could perhaps use these in conjunction with my new found understanding of the Nikon F3 to create some images.

To this end I set about what is recorded in the selection of snaps below.  It’s best not to indulge in too much analysis of what on earth I was thinking, though professional psychologists might enjoy holidays in five star luxury on the fees they might accrue from seeking an explanation.

It is said you should become familiar with just one type of film so, ignoring that advice, I’m on my third different film this week. This time it was Rollei Retro 100 in Rodinal at 20 degrees for 10 minutes.  That’s over 20% knocked off the recommended time but it seems to work for me just fine.  All shot with Nikon 60mm.

 

Tweaked in Lightroom 4 for no other reason than I can.

 

Light Found in a Bin with a Nikon F3 and 60mm Macro.

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 7, 2014 by yammerman

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I’m tidying the darkroom/studio in my attic  the night after I’ve seen ‘Looking for Light‘  the quite splendid documentary on the life and work of Observer photographer Jane Bown. I’m thinking about the huge 35mm prints up on the screen and the Olympus OM-1 sitting in a bag somewhere amongst the pile of old cameras I’ve acquired  over the last few years.  I’m feeling inspired by the images I’ve seen and the slight grain I could see in the prints leaves me itching for the smell of fixer and the gurgle of water.  But the rain hammers on the roof  and I must clear enough space so that my brain can function before I shoot anymore film.

I plod on and then as I throw redundant packaging and old guitar strings into the bin, I see the roll of film I’d processed on Sunday and grumpily thrown there when I’d discovered my own stupidity manifest as a light leak. I remember an image in the viewfinder of a  plant standing tall and a twisting piece of metal looking like a cobra about to strike. I surveyed the roll and discover that image and several others have escaped the full eviscerating effect of their accidental exposure to light. ‘There you are’  Jane Bown used to say after wandering around her subjects till she found the person she was seeking for her portrait and I mumbled  the same as an incantation to the gods of photography.  They are not perfect as the gatecrashing light seeps in one side of the images but I like them well enough that I’m glad I gave then a second chance before the oblivion of landfill. I found twelve images I could rescue and after scanning choose the four below as worthy of posting.

I love a happy ending though it’s back to the tidying for me now.

 

A Few Shots with a Nikon F3 and 60mm Macro

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 4, 2014 by yammerman

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Further use of the Nikon F3  using the 60mm Macro, which has always been a favourite for both film and digital.  A stroll to the pier and then some macro in the garden. It was all going so well until I discovered the back of the camera opened as I rewound the second roll. Give light a second and it does it worst to those grains of silver. A  deep sigh then processed and found to be ruined so straight in the bin. Naturally the second had the award winning images on so that was a damn shame. Here is the best of the first roll.

Shot with  Ilford FP4 at 125 processed in Rodinal/Adonal 1 to 50 for 12 minutes at 21 degrees.

Training for a Marathon with a Nikon F3 and 18mm f2.8 Lens

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 2, 2014 by yammerman

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I’m in training for a marathon; not the 26 mile torture that involves the human body searching for a wall to hit, but the photographic kind. The Cardiff Photo Marathon has been going since 2004 and I try to take part as often as I’m able. The rules require 12 photos in 12 hours on 12 topics supplied 4 at a time throughout the day. Sounds easy enough but it is in fact a grueling test of both your physical and creative stamina.

It was switched to digital a few years back which meant the loss of the delayed gratification that comes with using film.  There are no weeks of excitement now, waiting for the exhibition to see what on earth you captured on your precious roll of film. At the end of a long day, you now know if you have got photographic gold or a series of ‘What was I thinking?’ moments. I realised last time that deleting as I went along was a mistake, because by keeping all your ideas for each topic in chronological order you can then edit the set with a retrospective view on the whole day.  There is nothing wrong with that but it’s quite a different challenge than when you use film. The truth is, I imagine, that plenty of people were taking digital snaps to see how their film idea was going to work……I sure did once or twice.

This year I noticed they were allowing 50 people to use film and in a purist moment of madness, I volunteered for this option.  Since then, I’ve been slightly panicking about what kind of hair shirt I’ve just pulled on. Choosing a camera is exercising me; should I take the easy option of a modern AF or old school manual.  To this end I’ve been shooting with my trusty old Nikon F3HP to see if it can hold up to the challenge. This did not start well and it pains me to confess the first roll didn’t load correctly and, unspotted by me, was failing to wind.  Imagine my horror when I realised this after an hour of purposeful photographic art … oh, how I chuckled.

Chastened by this disaster, I considered abandoning old school in favour of a Nikon F80 but thought I’d probably learnt my lesson and persisted.  This time I made sure I loaded the film correctly in the F3 and selected a Nikon 18mm lens to wander around the Cardiff Barrage.  I’m really not used to shooting this wide and had no idea what to expect which I guess is half the fun.

The viewfinder on the F3 is huge and uncluttered like a HD TV stuck to your eyeball.  That is a great advantage compared to looking at a digital LCD on a sunny day. I did occasionally forget I’d moved the exposure compensation dial and using 18mm as your field of vision increases the danger of tripping over stuff, but not for nothing was this camera a classic.  It feels solid and comfortable while all the controls fall easily to hand.  It was a dull old day and frankly the Barrage has very little new to offer me, but I managed two rolls of HP5 with ease.  By the end, I was warming to the idea of rocking up at the Millennium Centre with this rather lovely machine.

I processed in Ilford HC at 20 degrees   1 to 31 dilution for 6 minutes.  It’s the first time that I’ve used this developer for a while and it always seems stronger than I expect, resulting in over-processed negatives –  not so great for scanning.  It all gets a bit grainy for my tastes, so I’ll probably increase the dilution next time.  A tweak in Lightroom 4, with some Antique preset, and I’m done.

 

Out in the Sun with a Nikon F3 and 28mm Lens

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on April 20, 2011 by yammerman

 

This morning I was taken with a sudden urge to find my Nikon F3 and hold its ‘chunkiness’ in my hand. It has a good weight and, even though it is a bit worn, its construction is such that the odds are it might well out last me.  First produced in 1980 it has always seemed much older to me as its robustness strikes me as out of place in the flim flam eighties.  I also dug deep in the bag and found my Nikon 28mm f2.8 AIS to partner the F3 as I felt like going wide and it really is a very good lens.  I put a yellow filter on and found some Rollei Retro 400s that needed using up and I was ready to shoot.

The weather is fine as we approach Easter so it was an opportunity to drag James away from World of Warcraft, a game he purchased from the new game shop we have been lucky enough to have opened here in Penarth…..yeah just what we needed. This and the marvellous sweet shop, Umpa Lumpa, James seems intent on single handedly ensuring that they will both remain thriving businesses long into the future.  One day I half expect to find James feet sticking out of the lap top as he is dragged into his second life as a mage or a healer.

We set off on our usual route to the pier where James will find ice cream and I will find photo opportunities. There was little of excitement to report except that the pier appeared to have been taken over by a party of French youngsters who provided a soundtrack of babbling French while James consumed his ice cream. I’ve always fancied Penarth as the Cannes of South Wales and I suppose this might be one way it could be achieved. We wended our way back home with James justifiably moaning at the number of times I stopped to take pictures but, really, there is no point in coming home with half a roll.

 In the baking attic, I  processed the Rollei  film in Rodinal 1+25 for 8 minutes and scanned them with the Epson V700 and below are my top ten.